The Cloud to Skyrocket 126 Percent Over the Next Three Years

The Cloud to Skyrocket 126 Percent Over the Next Three Years

This one goes out to all of the naysayers who claim the cloud is all hype; the ones who say the cloud is not it’s all chalked up to be; those who think cloud telephony is technology’s greatest fad. Research now shows that the cloud is poised to grow a previously unfathomable 126 percent over the next three years – an average 42 percent growth per year.

In conjunction with GigaOM and a variety of other collaborating organizations, North Bridge Venture Partners released the results of its third annual Future of Cloud Computing Survey, which examined drivers, inhibitors and opportunities in the cloud computing space and questioned hundreds of respondents from business users to IT decision makers to cloud vendors.

According to the study, cloud adoption continued on throughout the first half of 2013. In fact, 75 of those surveyed said that they use some sort of cloud platform for their business – a number that increased an incredible 67 percent from 2012. This growth remains consistent with projections from GigaOM research forecasting a total worldwide cloud computing market of $158.8 billion by 2014 – representing an incredible 126.5 percent growth from 2011.

The report goes on to identify what it deems “several important shifts in why and how cloud computing is being used,” barriers to entry and more. According to Michael Skok, general partner, North Bridge Venture Partners, “…the cloud formations we identified in last year’s survey are clearly on an unstoppable rise…[but] to realize the promise of the cloud, there is a clear call for the industry as a whole to help reduce complexity, and provide better interoperability.”

Furthermore, according to David Card, VP of Research, GigaOM, “Technology buyers expect cloud adoption will make managing IT increasingly complex, yet the plurality also expect overall better cost of ownership. That’s either wishful thinking or an intriguing opportunity for suppliers and system integrators.”

These integral shifts in cloud computing only mark the beginning of a promising cloud-computing revolution. For the contact center industry, that boils down to transformative, disruptive cloud-based call center software.

What do you foresee for cloud computing in the contact center?

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