Over 60 Percent of Retailers Unaware of What Unified Communications Can Do For Their Business

Over 60 Percent of Retailers Unaware of What Unified Communications Can Do For Their Business

Unified communications (UC) – or technology that integrates real-time communication services such as instant message (IM), Web chat or social media into more standard communication services – offers an abundance of opportunity. But before you can enjoy the benefits and advantages of unified communications, you have to first be aware of what it can do for your business.

A new report commissioned by Elite Telecom in association with Swyx and Retail Week – a UC manufacturer – details the shocking facts regarding retail. Specifically, only 13.4 percent of retailers use unified communications within their operation, and almost 70 percent of retail executives are not familiar with, or fully aware of, the advantages that UC offers.

Due to the high demand for digital and online channels, and with the subsequent decline of voice as today’s prime communication method, unified communications has become top-of-mind for businesses looking to stay ahead of the competition and position themselves as thought-leaders and innovators in the space. In fact, the need to support diversifying methods of customer service is what almost 40 percent of survey participants cited as being a driver for deploying unified communications.

For example, a virtual call center that is fully Web-based can provide retailers with the unified communication services they need to increase customer retention, and in turn, boost profit. For example, customers who engage with a business over social media have been proven to spend 20 to 40 percent more money, according to a Bain & Company Report.

Elite Telecom CEO Matt Newing noted:

Unified communications enhances the communication at every stage of the purchase cycle: Investing in UC allows retailers to optimize processes whilst improving quality in their user journey, offering loyalty to the customer to increase sales and profits. Those businesses that are too slow to adapt to technology advances or to internet-led services will simply not be here in two to three years’ time.

Now is the time to strike while the iron is hot. Who knows what would happen if more retailers jumped aboard the unified communications train?

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